02

Sep

2013

On this day September 2

Posted on September 2, 2013 in Misc DJ Blogs

On this Day September 2

1661 – Composer George Bohm was born. Böhm was born in 1661 in Hohenkirchen, Thuringia. He received his first music lessons from his father, a schoolmaster and organist who died in 1675. He may also have received lessons from Johann Heinrich Hildebrand, Kantor at Ohrdruf, who was a pupil of Heinrich Bach and Johann Christian Bach. After his father’s death, Böhm studied at the Lateinschule at Goldbach, and later at the Gymnasium at Gotha, graduating in 1684. Both cities had Kantors taught by the same members of the Bach family who may have influenced Böhm. On 28 August 1684 Böhm entered the University of Jena. Little is known about Böhm’s university years or his life after graduation. He resurfaces again only in 1693, in Hamburg. We know nothing of how Böhm lived there, but presumably he was influenced by the musical life of the city and the surrounding area. French and Italian operas were regularly performed in Hamburg, while in the area of sacred music, Johann Adam Reincken of St. Katharine’s Church (Katharinenkirche) was one of the leading organists and keyboard composers of his time. Böhm may have also heard Vincent Lübeck in the nearby Stade, or possibly even Dieterich Buxtehude in Lübeck, which was also close.

Böhm died on 18 May 1733 at the advanced age of 71. His son Jakob Christian, who would have inherited his post, died young. The position eventually went to Ludwig Ernst Hartmann, Böhm’s son-in-law.

Composer George Bohm

 

1862 – Composer Alphons Diepenbrock was born. Alphonsus Johannes Maria Diepenbrock (2 September 1862 in Amsterdam – 5 April 1921) was a Dutch composer, essayist and classicist. Diepenbrock was not a musician by training. Brought up in a prosperous Roman Catholic family, although he showed musical ability as a child, the expectation was that he would enter a university rather than a conservatory. And so he studied classics at the University of Amsterdam, gaining his doctorate cum laude in 1888 with a dissertation in Latin on the life of Seneca. The same year he became a teacher, a job which he held until 1894, and his decision to devote himself to music. As a composer, he had been completely self-taught from an early age.

He created a musical idiom which, in a highly personal manner, combined 16th-century polyphony with Wagnerian chromaticism, to which in later years was added the impressionistic refinement that he encountered in Debussy’s music.

His predominantly vocal output is distinguished by the high quality of the texts used. Apart from the Ancient Greek dramatists and Latin liturgy, he was inspired by, among others, Goethe, Novalis, Vondel, Brentano, Hölderlin, Heine, Nietzsche, Baudelaire and Verlaine.

As a conductor, he performed many contemporary works, including Gustav Mahler’s Fourth Symphony (at the Concertgebouw) as well as works by Fauré and Debussy.

Throughout his life, Diepenbrock continued his interests in the wider cultural sphere, remaining a classics tutor and publishing works on literature, painting, politics, philosophy and religion. Indeed during his lifetime his musical skills were often overlooked. Nonetheless, Diepenbrock was very much a respected figure within musical circles. He counted amongst his friends Mahler, Richard Strauss and Arnold Schoenberg.

Alphons Diepenbrock is related to Cardinal Melchior von Diepenbrock, who was his great uncle, as well as to a branch of the family that immigrated to America in 1879.

Composer Alphons Diepenbrock

1917 – Composer Laurindo Almeida was born. Laurindo Almeida (September 2, 1917 – July 26, 1995) was a Brazilian virtuoso guitarist and composer who made many recordings of enduring impact in classical, jazz and Latin genres. He is widely credited, with fellow artist Bud Shank, for creating the fusion of Latin and jazz which came to be known as the “Jazz Samba.” Almeida was the first artist to receive Grammy Awards for both classical and jazz performances. His discography encompasses more than a hundred recordings over five decades.

Laurindo Almeida

1924 – The operetta “Rose Marie”, by Rudolf Friml, opened on Broadway.  Rose-Marie is an operetta-style musical with music by Rudolf Friml and Herbert Stothart, and book and lyrics by Otto Harbach and Oscar Hammerstein II. The story takes place in the Canadian Rockies and concerns Rose-Marie La Flemme, a French Canadian girl who loves miner Jim Kenyon. When Jim falls under suspicion for murder, her brother Emile plans for Rose-Marie to marry Edward Hawley, a city man.

The work premiered on Broadway at the Imperial Theatre on September 2, 1924, running for 557 performances. It was the longest-running Broadway musical of the 1920s until it was surpassed by The Student Prince (1926).It was then produced at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane in London in 1925, enjoying another extraordinary run of 581 performances. It was filmed twice in 1928, once in 1936 and again in 1954.

The best-known song from the musical is “Indian Love Call”. It became Jeanette MacDonald and Nelson Eddy’s “signature song”. Several other numbers have also become standards, including the title song.

The operetta "Rose Marie

1927 – Sophie Tucker recorded her song “Some of These Days.” Sophie Tucker (January 13, 1887 – February 9, 1966) was a Russian-born American singer, comedian, actress, and radio personality. Known for her stentorian delivery of comical and risqué songs, she was one of the most popular entertainers in America during the first half of the 20th century. She was widely known by the nickname “The Last of the Red Hot Mamas.

Tucker was born Sonya Kalish (Russian Соня Калиш) to a Jewish family en route to America from Tulchyn, Russian Empire, now Vinnytsia Region, Ukraine.The family appropriated the last name Abuza, settled in Hartford, Connecticut, and opened a restaurant.

At a young age, she began singing at her parents’ restaurant for tips. Between taking orders and serving customers, Sophie “would stand up in the narrow space by the door and sing with all the drama I could put into it. At the end of the last chorus, between me and the onions there wasn’t a dry eye in the place.”

In 1903, at the age of 16, Tucker eloped with a local beer cart driver named Louis Tuck, from whom she would later derive her famous last name. When she returned home, her parents arranged an Orthodox wedding for the couple and in 1906, she gave birth to a son, Albert. However, shortly after Albert was born, the couple separated and Tucker left the baby with her family to move to New York

 Sophie Tucker Some of These Days.

1931 – The radio show “15 Minutes with Bing Crosby” debuted on CBS. Harry Lillis “Bing” Crosby, Jr. (May 3, 1903 – October 14, 1977) was an American singer and actor. Crosby’s trademark bass-baritone voice made him one of the best-selling recording artists of the 20th century, with over half a billion records in circulation.

A multimedia star, from 1934 to 1954 Bing Crosby was a leader in record sales, radio ratings, and motion picture grosses. His early career coincided with technical recording innovations; this allowed him to develop a laid-back, intimate singing style that influenced many of the popular male singers who followed him, including Perry Como, Frank Sinatra, and Dean Martin. Yank magazine recognized Crosby as the person who had done the most for American G.I. morale during World War II and, during his peak years, around 1948, polls declared him the “most admired man alive,” ahead of Jackie Robinson and Pope Pius XII. Also in 1948, the Music Digest estimated that Crosby recordings filled more than half of the 80,000 weekly hours allocated to recorded radio music.

15 Minutes with Bing Crosby

1935 – George Gershwin completed the orchestral score for the opera Porgy and Bess. George Gershwin (September 26, 1898 – July 11, 1937) was an American composer and pianist. Gershwin’s compositions spanned both popular and classical genres, and his most popular melodies are widely known. Among his best known works are the orchestral compositions Rhapsody in Blue (1924) and An American in Paris (1928), as well as the opera Porgy and Bess (1935).

Gershwin studied piano under Charles Hambitzer and composition with Rubin Goldmark and Henry Cowell. He began his career as a song plugger, but soon started composing Broadway theatre works with his brother Ira Gershwin and Buddy DeSylva. He moved to Paris to study with Nadia Boulanger, where he began to compose An American in Paris. After returning to New York City, he wrote Porgy and Bess with Ira and the author DuBose Heyward. Initially a commercial failure, Porgy and Bess is now considered one of the most important American operas of the twentieth century. Gershwin moved to Hollywood and composed numerous film scores until his death in 1937 from a brain tumor.

Gershwin’s compositions have been adapted for use in many films and for television, and several became jazz standards recorded in many variations. Countless celebrated singers and musicians have covered his songs.

George Gershwin

1946: Singer-songwriter, musician and actor Billy Preston is born in Houston, Texas. Preston first became famous as a session musician, working with artists such as Little Richard, Sam Cooke, Ray Charles and The Beatles, even sharing credit with the Fab Four on the single “Get Back.” He later found success as a solo artist in the 1970s with the hit singles “Outa-Space,” “Space Race,” “Will It Go Round in Circles” and “Nothing from Nothing.” Preston was also co-author, with The Beach Boys’ Dennis Wilson, of “You Are So Beautiful,” recorded by Preston and later a No. 5 hit for Joe Cocker.

Singer-songwriter, musician and actor Billy Preston

1963 – The Angels become the first white all-female group to have a No.1 record. The song was My Boyfriends Back.” The group originated in New Jersey as The Starlets which consisted of sisters, Barbara “Bibs” and Phyllis “Jiggs” Allbut, Bernadette Carroll, and Linda Malzone.

The Angels 1963 No. 1 hit single, "My Boyfriend's Back".

1965 – The Beatles received a gold record for the song “Help!”. The Beatles were an English rock band formed in Liverpool in 1960. Their best-known lineup, consisting of John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr, became considered by many as the greatest and most influential act of the rock era. Rooted in skiffle and 1950s rock and roll, the Beatles later utilized several genres, ranging from pop ballads to psychedelic rock, often incorporating classical elements in innovative ways. In the early 1960s, their enormous popularity first emerged as “Beatlemania”, but as their songwriting grew in sophistication, they came to be perceived by fans and cultural observers as an embodiment of the ideals shared by the era’s sociocultural revolutions.

Starting in 1960, the Beatles built their reputation playing clubs in Liverpool and Hamburg over a three-year period. Manager Brian Epstein molded them into a professional act and producer George Martin enhanced their musical potential. They gained popularity in the United Kingdom after their first modest hit, “Love Me Do”, in late 1962. They acquired the nickname the “Fab Four” as Beatlemania grew in Britain over the following year, and by early 1964 they had become international stars, leading the “British Invasion” of the United States pop market. From 1965 on, the Beatles produced what many critics consider their finest material, including the innovative and widely influential albums Rubber Soul (1965), Revolver (1966), Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (1967), The Beatles (1968), and Abbey Road (1969). After their break-up in 1970, they each enjoyed successful musical careers. Lennon was shot and killed in December 1980, and Harrison died of lung cancer in November 2001. McCartney and Starr remain musically active.

The Beatles

 

 

1965 – The Rolling Stones appeared on the British TV show “Ready Steady Go!” Mick Jagger and Andrew Loog Oldham performed a parody of Sonny & Cher’s “I Got You Babe.”  The Rolling Stones are an English rock band formed in London in 1962. In the vanguard of the British Invasion of bands that became popular in the US from 1964–65 and an integral part of the counterculture of the 1960s. The Rolling Stones were also instrumental in making blues a major part of rock and roll, and of changing the international focus of blues culture to the more primitive blues typified by John Lee Hooker and by Chess Records artists such as Muddy Waters, writer of “Rollin’ Stone”, the song after which the band is named. American music critic Robert Palmer said the Rolling Stones’ “remarkable endurance” stems from being “rooted in traditional verities, in rhythm-and-blues and soul music” while “more ephemeral pop fashions have come and gone”.

The first settled line-up had Brian Jones on guitar and harmonica, Ian Stewart on piano, Mick Jagger on lead vocals and harmonica, Keith Richards on guitar and backing vocals, Bill Wyman on bass and Charlie Watts on drums. Jones left the band about a month prior to his death in 1969, and was replaced by Mick Taylor, who was replaced by Ronnie Wood in 1975. Since Wyman’s departure in 1993, bassist Darryl Jones has been a collaborator rather than an actual band member.

They were considered to be symbols of rebellious youth in their mid-1960s heyday, and were portrayed as the “Anti-Beatles”. During this time they scored a string of hit singles, many reaching the top of the international charts, particularly in the UK and US. They received a great deal of backlash upon the release of Their Satanic Majesties Request (1967), created as a reaction to The Beatles’ Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. Into the late 1960s and early 1970s the band released Beggars Banquet (1968), Let It Bleed (1969), Sticky Fingers (1971) and Exile on Main St. (1972). This string of four albums is considered to be the band’s “Golden Age”, and generally regarded as their finest work. After a period of criticism during the mid-1970s, they revived their commercial fortunes and popular appeal with 1978’s Some Girls, their best-selling studio album. Since this time through band friction and solo projects, they have released material less frequently, but have remained commercially popular and continue to embark on highly successful worldwide tours.

The Rolling Stones were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1989, and the UK Music Hall of Fame in 2004. Rolling Stone magazine ranked them fourth on the “100 Greatest Artists of All Time” list and their estimated album sales are above 200 million. They have released twenty-four studio albums, eleven live albums and numerous compilations. Sticky Fingers (1971) was their first of eight consecutive number one studio albums in the United States. In 2008 the Rolling Stones ranked 10th on the “Billboard Hot 100 All-Time Top Artists” chart. In 2012, they celebrated their 50th Anniversary with the release of new Greatest Hits album GRRR! featuring two new singles, including chart hit “Doom and Gloom”. In 2013, along with Arctic Monkeys and Mumford & Sons, they headlined Glastonbury

The Rolling Stones

1965 – The Beatles released “Yesterday.” “Yesterday” is a song originally recorded by the Beatles for their 1965 album Help!. Although credited to “Lennon–McCartney”, the song was written solely by Paul McCartney.

he Beatles "yesterday"

1970 – An ad was run in “Melody Maker” by Genesis. Phil Collins answered the ad and eventually joined the group.  Genesis are an English rock band that formed in 1967. The band consist of their three longest-tenured members: founding members Tony Banks (keyboards) and Mike Rutherford (bass, guitar); and Phil Collins (vocals, drums), who joined in 1970. Former members Peter Gabriel (vocals, flute), Steve Hackett (guitar) and Anthony Phillips (guitar) also played major roles in the band in its early years. Genesis are among the highest-selling recording artists of all time, with approximately 150 million albums sold worldwide.

In the late 1960s, with the release of their first album, Genesis’s music was initially regarded by the band and the fans as a pop experiment, referring to then-popular melodic pop. Then, over the course of a year, (beginning with their second album in mid-1970) they quickly evolved into a progressive rock band with the incorporation of complex song structures and elaborate instrumentation. Their concerts became theatrical experiences with innovative stage design, pyrotechnics, extravagant costumes and on-stage stories. This second phase was characterized by lengthy performances such as the 23-minute “Supper’s Ready” and the 1974 concept album, The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway. In the late ’70s and early ’80s the band’s musical direction changed once again, becoming more pop oriented and commercially accessible. This resulted in their first top 40 single in the US with “Follow You Follow Me”, their first number one album in the United Kingdom, Duke, and their only number one single in the United States, “Invisible Touch”.

Genesis

1971 – The Grateful Dead’s ex-manager was arrested for embezzling $70,000 from the band. Grateful Dead was an American rock band formed in 1965 in Palo Alto, California. The band was known for its unique and eclectic style, which fused elements of rock, folk, bluegrass, blues, reggae, country, improvisational jazz, psychedelia, and space rock,] and for live performances of long musical improvisation. “Their music,” writes Lenny Kaye, “touches on ground that most other groups don’t even know exists.” These various influences were distilled into a diverse and psychedelic whole that made the Grateful Dead “the pioneering Godfathers of the jam band world”. They were ranked 57th in the issue The Greatest Artists of all Time by Rolling Stone magazine. They were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1994 and their Barton Hall Concert at Cornell University (May 8, 1977) was added to the Library of Congress’s National Recording RegistryThe Grateful Dead have sold more than 35 million albums worldwide.

The Grateful Dead

1976 – The first issue of Musician magazine was published. Musician (1976–1999) was a monthly magazine that covered news and information about American popular music. Initially called “Music America”, it was founded in 1976 by Sam Holdsworth and Gordon Baird. The two friends borrowed $20,000 from relatives and started the publication in a barn in Colorado.

 

Musician (magazine)

1978 – George Harrison married Olivia Trinidad Arias. Olivia Trinidad Arias was a secretary at his Dark Horse record company. George Harrison,(25 February 1943 – 29 November 2001) was an English musician, singer and songwriter who achieved international fame as the lead guitarist of the Beatles. Harrison married Olivia Trinidad Arias, with whom he had one son, Dhani.

 

George Harrison and  Olivia Trinidad Arias.

 

1978 – The “Animal House” soundtrack was released. National Lampoon’s Animal House is a 1978 American comedy film directed by John Landis. The film was a direct spinoff from National Lampoon magazine. It is about a misfit group of fraternity members who challenge the dean of Faber College.

The screenplay was adapted by Douglas Kenney, Chris Miller, and Harold Ramis from stories written by Miller and published in National Lampoon magazine. The stories were based on Miller’s experiences in the Alpha Delta Phi fraternity at Dartmouth College. Other influences on the film came from Ramis’s experiences in the Zeta Beta Tau fraternity at Washington University in St. Louis, and producer Ivan Reitman’s experiences at Delta Upsilon at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario. Of the younger lead actors, only John Belushi was an established star, but even he had not yet appeared in a film, having gained fame mainly from his Saturday Night Live television appearances. Several of the actors who were cast as college students, including Karen Allen, Tom Hulce, and Kevin Bacon, were just beginning their film careers, although Tim Matheson was coming off a large role as one of the assassin motorcycle cops in the second Dirty Harry film, Magnum Force.

Upon its initial release, Animal House received generally mixed reviews from critics, but Time and Roger Ebert proclaimed it one of the year’s best. Filmed for $2.8 million, it is one of the most profitable movies of all time, garnering an estimated return of more than $141 million in the form of videos and DVDs, not including merchandising.

Animal House" soundtrack

1981 – The single “Controversy” was released by Prince. Prince Rogers Nelson (born June 7, 1958), known by his mononym Prince, is an American singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, and actor. He has produced ten platinum albums and thirty Top 40 singles during his career. He also has several hundred unreleased songs in his “vault”. He writes and produces his own music and plays most of the instruments; he has established his own recording studio and label. In addition, he has promoted the careers of Sheila E., Carmen Electra, the Time and Vanity 6, and his songs have been recorded by these artists and others, including Chaka Khan, the Bangles, Sinéad O’Connor, and Kim Basinger.

Born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, Prince developed an interest in music at an early age, writing his first song at age seven. After recording songs with his cousin’s band 94 East, seventeen-year-old Prince recorded several unsuccessful demo tapes before releasing his debut album, For You, in 1978. His 1979 album, Prince, went platinum due to the success of the singles “Why You Wanna Treat Me So Bad?” and “I Wanna Be Your Lover”. His next three records, Dirty Mind (1980), Controversy (1981), and 1999 (1982) continued his success, showcasing Prince’s trademark of prominently sexual lyrics and incorporation of elements of funk, dance and rock music. In 1984, he began referring to his backup band as the Revolution and released the album Purple Rain, which served as the soundtrack to his film debut of the same name.

After releasing the albums Around the World in a Day (1985) and Parade (1986), The Revolution disbanded and Prince released the critically acclaimed double album Sign “O” the Times (1987) as a solo artist. He released three more solo albums before debuting the New Power Generation band in 1991, which saw him changing his stage name to an unpronounceable symbol known as “The Love Symbol”. In 1994, he began releasing new albums at a faster pace to remove himself from contractual obligations to Warner Bros, releasing five records in a span of two years before signing to Arista Records in 1998. In 2000, he began referring to himself as “Prince” once again. He has released thirteen albums since then, including his latest, 20Ten, released in 2010.

 

Prince

1986 – Debbie Gibson, while still in school and only 16 years old, began recording the album “Out of the Blue.” Deborah Ann “Debbie” Gibson (born August 31, 1970) is an American singer-songwriter, record producer, and actress.

In 1988 she was pronounced the youngest artist to write, produce, and perform a #1 single on the Billboard Hot 100, with her song “Foolish Beat” and she remains the youngest female to write, record, and perform a #1 single. She has gone on to starring roles on Broadway and touring musicals, as well as independent film and television work. She continues to record, and reached the Billboard Adult Contemporary chart as high as #24 during 2006 in a duet with Jordan Knight titled “Say Goodbye”. In 2010, the album Ms. Vocalist, from Sony Japan was Top 10 on the Japanese Billboard chart and the first single from the album, “I Love You”, hit #1.

 

Debbie Gibson

1987 – The Amnesty International Tour started in London, starring Bruce Springsteen, Sting, Peter Gabriel and Tracy Chapman.

1988 – The Amnesty International Tour started in London at Wembley Stadium.

1989 – Ric Ocasek, of the Cars, married Paulina Porizkova.

1993: Pearl Jam’s “Jeremy” video wins four awards, including Video of the Year, at the MTV Video Music Awards. The band responded by not making any more videos until 1998.

Pearl Jam

1995: The opening of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland is celebrated with a star-studded opening ceremony featuring performances by such stars as Bob Dylan, Chuck Berry, James Brown, Aretha Franklin, Little Richard, Al Green, Jerry Lee Lewis, Johnny Cash, John Mellencamp and Bruce Springsteen.

 The opening of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland

 

1997 – WAR released its 20th album, “Coleccion Latina.”

2010 – At Nashville’s Bridgestone Arena, Brooks & Dunn played their final show together at a fundraiser for the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum.

 

 

 
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